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On Ritual Praxis -Structure, Roles and Responsibilities

February 3, 2019 Leave a comment

Up until now the majority of the On Ritual Praxis posts have been applicable to both the individual and to groups. Having started at the individual level and worked our way outward, it is time to dig into the larger spheres Heathens are within. I will start with how my Kindred and I understand the structures Heathens operate within, the structures of Heathenry, and then on to the roles and responsibilities people within them may take up. As with other posts in regards to On Ritual Praxis, these are meant to be guides rather than exhaustive, and reflective of how my Kindred and I work. Folks may have different kind of relationship based on structure, worldview, or specific home culture from which their Heathen religion springs.

Structures in Heathenry -Innangarð and Utgarð

The most basic structure in Heathenry for my Kindred and I is the innangarð and utgarð. The innangarð, meaning within the yard/enclosure, start with our Gods, Ancestors and vaettir, us as individuals, our families (chosen and blood), and our Kindred. This innangarð extends out to our allies and friends. Those who are not innangarð are utgarð, outide the yard/enclosure.

Why does this structure matter so much?

It is how we prioritize our lives. It is where we understand ourselves as fitting within, and to whom we owe obligation. It is how we understand how our ørlög and Urðr unfolds, and to whom both are tied most tightly. This does not mean that those in the utgarð are beyond consideration, that only our innangarð matters, or that we are given license to ignore the responsibilities we share with the larger communities in which we live. It means that those within our innangarð have highest priority, and it is where the bulk of our energy, attention, and work belongs.

If the basic understanding is that one’s first priorities are to the Gods, Ancestors, and vaettir, then good relationships with Them are one’s first obligation. Likewise one develops a hierarchy of relationships and obligation to one’s self, family, friends, and allies. An understanding of the structure of one’s life begins with understanding one’s cosmology. That understanding then extends into every relationship one has, whether it is with those in the innangarð or those outside it. It extends to every piece of food we eat, even to the media we consume. A cosmology exists everywhere in every moment or it exists nowhere. We do not put our cosmology on pause, we live within it.

The innangarð and utgarð are extensions of our polytheist understanding. Those Gods, Ancestors, and vaettir we worship and hold relationships with are within our innangarð. Those we do not are utgarð. This does not mean that Gods, Ancestors, or vaettir that are utgarð are always bad for us or wrong to worship, merely that they are not within our primary scope of obligation. The Holy Powers in our innangarð are those we worship and have relationships with. They are who we turn to when things are rough and who we celebrate festivals and victories with. Likewise, the people in our innangarð are those we turn to when things are rough and help in turn, and celebrate our victories with.

Structures in Heathenry -Families, Hearths, and Tribes

Heathenry as an identifier is useful only insofar as it signals to ourselves and others that our worldview, religion, and culture is based in lived religion whose backgrounds are based in reconstructing/reviving ancient polytheist religions of Northern Europe which included Scandinavia, Germany, and Anglo-Saxon peoples among others. So we may say we are Scandinavian Heathen group, or an Anglo-Saxon Heathen tribe, or a Germanic Heathen hearth. Even so, this breakdown can miss the differences a given Anglo-Saxon Heathen tribe may have from one based in Texas vs Tennessee. We may share cosmological principles, and our conception of and relationships with Gods, Ancestors, and vaettir may be similar, but there will always be variations between how we relate to and understand each principle, God, Ancestor, and vaettr based in each person, family, hearth, or tribe’s relationships with these principles and Beings. Innangarð, utgarð, ørlög, and Urðr (or culture-specific names holding similar meaning) as understood through one’s Heathen worldview are the primary means for understanding and establishing webs of relationships. With this in mind, I primarily understand and refer to Heathenry as communities of tribal religions.

Some Heathen groups have not and may never make it to being a tribal group simply because they are a single person, family, or hearth that does not ‘click’ with any other ones. A Heathen whose organizing stays at the individual level has no more or less inherent value than one that is a tribe. It means the way one does ritual will change, who one is tied to in obligation changes, and the complexity of one’s relationships changes. The point of identifying structure is not to make tribe something to aim at nor solitary worship in Heathenry as something to avoid. The purpose of going through these terms, especially in how I am using words here, is to develop words with clear meaning for our communities.

Simply put, a family is a group of people related to each other by blood, marriage, or association. A hearth is the home/place in which a family or many families are gathered with a common religious outlook and practice. Tribes are associations of families and/or hearths linked by shared culture and religion. Mimisbrunnr Kindred, for instance, is a tribe made up of many hearths, each with its own family.

Divisions of Innangarð

I like to think of innangarð and utgarð as a series of circles. The first circle of the innangarð is the hearth, the second the bú (farmstead), the third the Kindred/tribe or other groups, the fourth is the Thing, and fifth are the wider associations we hold.

The hearth, as mentioned before, is in the home. These are the people closest to you, often those sharing your physical space every day. This is the level at which folks provide daily mutual support, raise their families, and live together.

I chose to use the word bú, or farmstead, to describe the second circle to connect the importance of those who are within it. As with a farmstead, those in the second circle together work together in close contact, trust each other, and mutually support one another and complete projects together that benefit each other and their communities. Why not name it something like family or the Kindred? Not everyone who is Kindred may have that kind of relationship with one another, either due to the nature of one’s relationships with a Kindred, time, or space limitations.

The third circle is the Kindred/tribe. These are members of our particular religious and culture communities, such as Mimirsbrunnr Kindred. Some folks at the Kindred level might blend back and forth between the different circles of innangarð, providing support for one another and caring for members within their Kindred/tribe as they can. A person within a hearth circle vs a Kindred circle is that they may provide less material and work support than others at the hearth or bú circle. Kindred ties are often likened to family ones, and this is also part of my experience. The emotional ties are certainly there, but the kinds of things that are expected of me at the hearth level, which includes the meeting of financial obligations and physical needs are less expected at the Kindred level. While I am fully happy to help Kindred members with meeting these needs the expectation is not there that I do that on a regular basis as it is with my hearth.

The Thing is another circle in which I took inspiration from history. A Thing was called to engage in trade, settle disputes, and make plans to work on projects. To my understanding the Thing circle is locally based, including my Kindred in relation to other co-religionists, allies to my hearth, Kindred, and tribe. The Thing circle are those our hearths, Kindreds, tribes, etc. are co-equal with who may come together for cross-community projects, conversation, conventions, or settling of disputes.

The fifth circle, associations, are the communities we have connection to but little in the ways of formal oaths or direct ties into our hearths, Kindreds, tribes, and other closer communities. The association circle we could look at as communities in which we may have mutual interests or some connection with, such as Pagan Pride groups, pan-Pagan groups and gatherings, perhaps the local brewing guild a member might be a part of, etc. These are people we have connections with and may even be important members of, but the connections we maintain with these communities stops at anything insular to our lives. The PPD communities aren’t going to be coming over to my home to help vacuum my house or make sure there’s food in the pantry; that’s a hearth through to Kindred circle thing. We might come together to celebrate Pride day or circle around to remember our Dead, but the community is not involved in one’s everyday life so much as one belongs to the community. A local brewing guild might be a source of great inspiration and camaraderie in the journey of a brewer, but aside from maybe hosting a gathering they will not be involved much in one’s day-to-day life.

Structure in Heathenry -Organizational Models

Since Heathen religions are tribal each group may organize itself differently and for different reasons. In my Kindred’s case our organization structure is hierarchical. I am a goði, filling a role as leader both as a chieftain and priest of the Kindred. As a goði I represent the Kindred as an organization to the Gods, Ancestors, vaettir, and the communities in which we live and interact. The others are, at the moment, lay members and do not hold leadership or ritual role positions though any of us might make offerings or prayers. The point of a Heathen goði insofar as we are concerned is as a leader, diviner, priest organizing and conducting rites, a representative for the group before the Holy Powers and communities, and a helpmeet to the Kindred’s members in keeping good relationships with one another and the Holy Powers.

We organize hierarchically in Mimisbrunnr Kindred for a few reasons. The Kindred started as a Rune study group with me leading it, and grew from there into a Northern Tradition/Heathen study group. From there, we grew into a working group, and from that group we grew into Mimisbrunnr Kindred. Our worldview as Heathens is hierarchical, whether we look to our Gods, our ancient Heathen Ancestors, or many of our vaettir as examples of how to organize ourselves. We work with a hierarchy model because through it we are organizing ourselves in a manner similar to our Gods, Ancestors, and many of our vaettir. We work in a hierarchy because it works for us, and we have not been told by our Holy Powers to adopt another model. Our roles in the Kindred are clearly delineated, and the work each of us has to do is supported by each of us doing our work.

Other groups may organize along different lines. I have read on groups which operate in egalitarian ways, and others that organize along strict king/subject relationships. Others organize as loose groups of people who come together to share in the occasional rite together. Each group will need to find which model works for it and the purpose it is gathering for.

Structure in Heathenry -General Roles: Laity, Leaders, and Spiritual Specialists

Laity

Laity are non-specialists in religious communities and tend to comprise the core of most religions’ members. There may be leaders in the laity, such as a head of a hearth or heading up a charity or some essential function in a family, Kindred, or Tribe. What differs laity from spiritual specialists is that lay members’ lives share the common elements of Heathen worldview and religious communities.

Just because a given Heathen is a layperson that does not mean they cannot do spiritual work or that they have any more or less value to a given Heathen community. Any Heathen, given practice and dedication to the work, can learn to divine. What differs a layperson who divines from a diviner, who is a spiritual specialist in a given community, is that the diviner does their work for the community as a respected authority or guide, and the layperson who divines may be talented but does not hold a wider communal role in doing divination.

Leaders

To lead is to “organize and direct”, to “show (someone or something) a destination by way to a destination by going in front of or beside them”, “set (a process) in motion”, to be “initiative in an action; an example for others to follow”.

A leader is someone who shows the way forward by walking it. It is someone that takes responsibility not only for one’s own actions but for anyone that follows them. A leader organize, directs, and sets those around them in motion. Leaders in Heathenry tend to be some kind of spiritual specialist whether or not they hold a formal title in a group. However, this is not a strict requirement. One can hold a leadership position in a group and still refer to spiritual specialists for things like divination or spiritual work needing to be done.

There is at least one leader for the hearth. This is someone who, whether by choice of the hearth or by default, represents that hearth before the Gods, Ancestors, and vaettir. They model right relationships if there are others in the hearth, tend to be the ones who makes the prayers and offerings first, and does divination to see if offerings are accepted. My wife and I share these duties in our hearth.

Spiritual Specialists

A spiritual specialist is a person who has developed skill, expertise, and works in some kind of religious role within a Heathen community. Some examples of this include goði/gyðja, priests, spiritworkers, diviners, spáworkers, seiðworkers, Runeworkers, and sacrificers, among a great many. Spiritual specialists may do one job, eg diviner or sacrificer, and otherwise hold a role in a given Heathen group like laity.

Spiritual specialists are not, by default, leaders, though many are. For example, a diviner may be consulted by a group, but the diviner may have absolutely no role in how the results of divination are acted on by the group or how a leader reacts and plans once divination has been done. Depending on the size of a hearth, Kindred, tribe, etc there may be no specialized roles like these, or one or two people may be called on to fill multiple roles.

Structure in Heathenry -Hosts and Guests

The structure around hosts and guests in Heathenry has a long history on which the home cultures have a lot to say. The Hávamál, for instance, has a great deal to say on the roles of hosts and guests. Structure of this sort extends to the holders of a hearth and visitors to the hearth itself in or out of ritual. This structure also is present in Kindred members hosting a ritual or gathering to non-members. Whether or not a visitor has religious business with a host makes little difference. As these are lived worldviews, structures like these do not end or start at our doorstep; these are lived wherever we go.

A host’s responsibilities include making sure a given guest is comfortable, free from hunger and thirst, and understands their role in the hearth, Kindred space, ritual, etc. This includes what taboos they need to observe such as “do not touch the altar or ritual items without permission” or a requirement like “make an offering to the hearth’s Holy Powers on entering”. For purposes of a ritual, a host may need to provide instruction for a newcomer to Heathenry, or to provide offerings for a given ritual so the guest can make them. The host needs to be aware as they can of everyone’s taboos, requirements, and so on, so both ritual and non-ritual situations can proceed in peace and order.

A guest’s responsibility includes being careful, humble, and not demanding too much from their host while making every effort to be firm in their own needs and requirements prior to visiting. Observing the rules of a hearth, Kindred meeting, and/or ritual is a must, as is following directions for ritual, and abiding by the host and other guests’ taboos and requirements where able. If conflict can arise it is the guest’s responsibility to inform the host. While a host needs to know everyone’s taboos, requirements, etc they do not live with a guest’s taboos or requirements, and may need reminding.

While this may all seem self-explanatory, the back and forth reciprocity of what I have written here is anything but. Many people may consider asking a person what their taboos or requirements are invasive, while others may be too shy or shrinking to state the needs their Gods, Ancestors, vaettir, or personal circumstances have placed on them. Still others may simply not know how to ask or say, so having that onus on both host and guest is one that can prevent sources of problems. This same onus in regards to ritual also helps to prevent issues arising from a given host or guest’s taboos, needs, or requirements in ritual space. Far better to be notified ahead of time needing to apologize in a ritual for a slight, even if it was not meant.

Such a taboo or requirement may be quite simple. While I drink I have Kindredmates that do not. Part of the onus on me as a leader in a Kindred ritual, such as a celebratory feast, would be to ask what they can drink as a substitute, such as juice or root beer, and provide it, or to encourage them to find an alternative they are comfortable with. The Kindredmate has to be honest with me, asserting their need to have an alcohol-free choice just as I need to sensitive to that need. Likewise, being a diabetic, I may ask that there be diabetic friendly options for me in the celebration feast. The role of host and guest is reciprocal, each having a piece in determining the comfort and well-being of the other.

Structure in Heathenry -Grith and Frith

The word grith is related to sanctuary and security, while frith is related to peace and good social order. Both are to be held sacred by guest and host. A host provides an environment that is safe and secure for the guest, providing a place for grith and frith to be, while the guest does not bring things or do things that would harm grith or frith. Again, reciprocity is the rule of Heathenry.

Which Gods, Ancestors, and vaettir are being worshiped are part of how one designs a ritual and influences what good conduct for it would be. Part of keeping grith, especially in ritual, is to be sure that everyone gathered observes the rules of the ritual and the sacred space. If a God, Goddess, Ancestors, or vaettr to whom the ritual is dedicated has a taboo to observe then the host needs to be sure everyone is keeping to it. Something as simple as everyone turning off their cell phones prior to a rite is keeping grith.

Keeping frith in ritual is everyone being involved in the ritual and carrying it out well, and avoiding what would interrupt the rite, or cause problems during it. This is part of why roles can be important. If there is a need to do divination then having a designated diviner who divines and interprets the divination will allow the ritual to proceed with good order and clear ways forward. Having a ritual leader allows for the leader to correct missteps or to help with folks unused to ritual, or one of its forms without folks stepping on one another’s toes or undoing the ordered space of the ritual.

Being mindful of the vé, what to or what not to place on it, and at what time, is part of grith and frith. Each hearth’s relationship with the Holy Powers, layout of their vé, what is and is not acceptable as offerings, on and on, has the potential to be different from any other hearth’s. Open and honest communication about every aspect of a ritual, and if there is to be some kind of celebration, what everyone’s taboos, allergies, etc are is a must. Nothing will spoil a ritual like having to firmly stop someone from making an offering that is taboo, or a post-ritual feast like having to rush someone to the hospital because someone did not list the ingredients in a dish!

Structure in Heathenry -Gebo, Megin, and Hamingja

The focus of Heathen ritual praxis has its feet firmly planted in the idea of gipt fa gipt, gift for a gift. In other words, reciprocity. I often refer to it on this blog as simply Gebo or living in good Gebo. The reason we do ritual is to establish, strengthen, and appreciate our relationships with the Holy Powers. Doing this allows for the good flow of megin and hamingja between the Holy Powers and us, and between those we engage with in ritual.

Megin translates to “might”, “power”, “strength”, “ability”. Hamingja translates to “luck”, “group luck”, group power”, “group spirit”, or it has to do with the guardian of one’s family line or power, often seen in a female fylgja. Where megin is more straightforward, because of the issues Lars Lönnroth states about how hamingja has come down to us, different people relate to the concept in different ways. Some view or experience it as a straightforward force, and others as a spirit. Regardless, megin and hamingja are built well in good Gebo.

Why might we care about having healthy, well cared for megin and hamingja? These are pieces of our soul. Megin is the ability to affect the world around us, to do things. Hamingja is the unfolding of our ørlög and Urðr with others, whether through the spheres of influence we can affect or how others affect us. Megin and hamingja are how we get things done, how are actions are felt through the things we do.

Gebo, megin, hamingja, and all they touch are integrated. By doing right by our Gods, Ancestors, vaettir, and one another, we allow for the good flow of Gebo, and the building of good megin and hamingja. By building good megin and hamingja we build our webs of relationships well in ørlög and Urðr. Whether we are alone or in a hearth, Kindred, tribe, or a larger community, in doing this we allow for the foundation of good relationships with our Gods, Ancestors, vaettir, and with one another. These good foundations are what Heathenry is built from.

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Communities and Tribalism

October 7, 2013 Leave a comment

Tribalism is a term that, nowadays, gets a good deal of bad rap.  It is thrown around, like many words, and is taken out of its original meaning and is then twisted.   It is something that gets to me, as I find the word tribe and the concept of having a tribe to actually be a good thing rather than a negative one.  The Oxford English Dictionary gives the following definition: “the state or fact of being organized in a tribe or tribes”.  The entry notes that this is derogatory.  According to The Online Etymology Dictionary, the word originated in 1886, meaning “condition of being a tribe”, meaning “group loyalty”. Strange that a word that could have very positive connotations is now used as a weapon in debates.

Digging into the word tribe, again, from the Oxford English Dictionary, “a social division in a traditional society consisting of families or communities linked by social, economic, religious, or blood ties, with a common culture and dialect, typically having a recognized leader.”  The two examples given beneath the definition are “indigenous Indian tribes” and “the Celtic tribes of Europe“.  Notice that there is no mention of race.  In the example provided, the indigenous people of America and Europe are separated by their culture and dialect, not by race.  The divisions are social, not racial.  With this understanding of tribe, and tribalism, I find it maddening that the words are being misused when I find them to represent something quite beautiful. So what does tribe mean in a situation where a polytheist and animist worships and works with many Gods?  It means that one worships a group of Gods, Ancestors, and spirits and has ties of loyalty to those in one’s tribe.  These ties can be linked by family, lineage, adoption, and/or oaths.

In my own case, my spiritual House, House Sankofa, is one of my tribes, as are others who have adopted me into their own tribe.  In House Sankofa we are not limited in who we can worship, but we are limited in the sense that our identification is polytheist and/or animist in terms of religious identity.  Our Gods are approached in respect, each according to Their own ways.  Our Gods, Ancestors, and spirits are given veneration, and all are treated with respect.  Our loyalties also do not need to be limited to just House Sankofa; I am a member of both House Sankofa, and recently joined another tribe without conflict with either one.

There is a key difference, however, between this House and a lot of groups organized online: in addition to being a member, I have physically worked with and worshiped with the members of House Sankofa.  As John Beckett says in his article, Tribalism: The Good, The Bad, and The Future to a commenter: “There is a place for virtual tribes, and long-distance networking within and between tribes will remain important. But there is no substitute for people you can actually touch.”  I agree with this, and it is because of this contact, my membership in, and ongoing work with House Sankofa, that I mark myself intimately connected with House Sankofa as I do with those of my smaller groups. What this does not mean is that all, or any of our religious practice looks exactly the same.  Tribalism, or belonging to any group really, need not mean absolute conformity.  Each person may not get along with this or that God, or this religious practice does not speak to them or work in their relationship with the Gods.  Tribalism does not equal uniformity in expression of our religious paths, nor of our relationships with the Gods, Ancestors, and/or spirits.  I, for instance, do not work well with plant spirits whereas another House member might.  In general, with the exception of one God, I do not work with the Greek Gods as part of my everyday practice.  Yet, I have House members that do.  One does not need to be all things to all Gods, Ancestors, and/or spirits, especially if one can rely on others to keep good relationships flowing.  Not all of us are priests, shamans, and/or spiritworkers.  Some are just people worshiping their Gods, Ancestors, and spirits.

So there’s a lot out there decrying why tribalism is a bad thing.  What are some good points to tribalism?

  1. Each member is part and parcel of a group of people who are organized around sets of principles, traditions, and/or sets of beliefs.
  2. There is a unity in the group, in focus, works, direction, etc.
  3. There is a hierarchy, and people to answer to in leadership positions and in non-leadership positions.
  4. There is a built-in support structure for all members.
  5. Changes made at the tribal level are easier to see, the impact can be more immediate, and the ripples from change can be followed up on sooner and more efficiently.
  6. There are set ways that people can become part of the tribe which can reduce conflict, and make sure prospective members are a good fit for the tribe.
  7. There are accepted methods of conduct within the tribe and in situations such as meetings, ritual, etc.
  8. There are accepted ways of resolving conflict that serve to help tamp down on hostilities while providing methods of conflict resolution.
  9. Each member is both a contributor and receiver, each to their own ways, means, and abilities.

Hierarchy does not need to mean your voice becomes worthless, or that your leader can or should ignore your voice.  Hierarchy does not mean that a leader can simply go whichever direction they like, either.  Like an arrow, there is a point that drives home the shaft to its target, the shaft itself that transports the point and the energy of the bow, and the feathers that keep the arrow on track.  All are essential to the arrow’s flight.  The bow is the common origin from which the arrows springs, such as the shared beliefs, traditions, etc. of the group.  The string is the zeal of the group, the drive to a certain goal, etc.

The unity found in a tribe is powerful.  When you share symbolism, ritual, values, identity, and so on, it is a powerful bond.  Anyone who has been initiated into a religious system can attest to this  This is true whether you are a Confirmed Catholic, an initiated Wiccan, or part of the Northern Tradition.  You place yourself into the worldview, hierarchy, and all the rest when you take on the label.  Further, with a tribe, you are accepting your role within that community, and all the responsibilities that come with it.  This differs from solely being part of a religious organization, at least here in America.  It carries a different weight to say “I am a member of House Sankofa” than it is to say “I am Pagan”.  It carries the weight not only of what it means to be a member of that organization, but one’s place within it.  The weight of the former is heavier, in my experience, than the latter.  After all, I can ignore the Pagan community if I do not agree with its consensus.  I can feel free to discard any notion of community with the larger Pagan community (note: but not the Pagan communities in which I am counted as part of tribe/in-group) far less effort than leaving House Sankofa.  The weight of that acceptance, those bonds of trust, love, and oaths, are not there with the larger Pagan community.

Unlike Paganism, for whom even the definition of the noun is still being debated on its baseline usefulness as a description, House Sankofa does have requirements of those seeking its membership.  It has clear rules set down as to what is expected of its members, as well as guests.  It has a few hard-stop rules, one of which being is that you need to be a polytheist.  So yes, tribes can be exclusionary.  That is what sets them apart, in some respects, from other groupings of people.  It is also what keeps tribes cohesive, collected, and moving in the same general direction when movement is required.  So while it sometimes can be a way of separation, it is also a way of bringing people together in a way all can flourish since there are no arguments on fundamental things like worldview, ritual etiquette, or role(s), as the rules and hierarchy of the tribe are accepted by all who are part of it.  This does not mean tribes do not change; much the contrary, part of the organization of a tribe allows it to take in new information and work with it.  What a tribe does not do, in general, is shift its fundamental positions that make up its identity.

When a group of people has an accepted worldview and way(s) of worship, that is, orthodoxy and orthopraxy, it is easier to keep a group together in ritual both in terms of headspace and in terms of expectation.  It is also easier to stay cohesive and focused on what is important to the tribe even if different relationships and new information comes into play from members’ individual experiences with the Gods, Ancestors, and spirits.  Having orthodoxy and orthopraxy, much rather than stifling a group or their individual journeys, gives rise to better ways to navigate them.  It is the difference between merely having a map and being able to read it.  A shared worldview and practice allows many contexts to all of the relationships in a tribe, physical and spiritual, making them easier to discern and integrate them into one’s life.

Tribalism provides a way for people to organize in ways that are harder to break down than a social club, interest group, or open group.  In rough times, its structure demands banding together.  In times of plenty, sharing.  This ongoing Gebo not only assures that the tribe keeps going, but it goes strong.  Special interest groups, if they achieve their ends or if they fail, tend not to last because these ties of sharing simply do not exist.  There is no idea of ‘if we fail we fail together’, excepting in the abstract of failing to execute the ends to which the group was founded for.

Tribes give touchstones to people, to our Gods, Ancestors, and spirits that few groups can offer.  They give us a sense of place and belonging.  They give us a sense of healthy identity.  They give us support for the roads we travel together.  A tribe exists in some way, shape, or form, to exist and propagate itself so that all within it do better, building with and on each generation and adoption of people that comes into it.  It is grown stronger by unity and diversity.  In an age where resource scarcity and poverty are increasing both in undeniable visibility and scope, tribalism offers hope, to bring people together with bonds that can withstand what challenges the future brings.  It offers a future built together with those you trust with your soul, mind, and life.

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