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Posts Tagged ‘Hanging’

A Note on Doubt, Patience, and Follow-Through

October 10, 2013 Leave a comment

Read this description of, then watch Dakota 38, a documentary film on Jim Miller, a Native American leader and Vietnam War veteran and those who journeyed with him:

In the spring of 2005, Jim Miller, a Native spiritual leader and Vietnam veteran, found himself in a dream riding on horseback across the great plains of South Dakota. Just before he awoke, he arrived at a riverbank in Minnesota and saw 38 of his Dakota ancestors hanged. At the time, Jim knew nothing of the largest mass execution in United States history, ordered by Abraham Lincoln on December 26, 1862.

“When you have dreams, you know when they come from the creator… As any recovered alcoholic, I made believe that I didn’t get it. I tried to put it out of my mind, yet it’s one of those dreams that bothers you night and day.”

Now, four years later, embracing the message of the dream, Jim and a group of riders retrace the 330-mile route of his dream on horseback from Lower Brule, South Dakota to Mankato, Minnesota to arrive at the hanging site on the anniversary of the execution. “We can’t blame the wasichus anymore. We’re doing it to ourselves. We’re selling drugs. We’re killing our own people. That’s what this ride is about, is healing.” This is the story of their journey- the blizzards they endure, the Native and Non-Native communities that house and feed them along the way, and the dark history they are beginning to wipe away.

This part in particular sticks out to me:

four years later, embracing the message of the dream, Jim and a group of riders retrace the 330-mile route of his dream on horseback from Lower Brule, South Dakota to Mankato, Minnesota to arrive at the hanging site on the anniversary of the execution.

It took Mr. Miller and those who joined him four years to complete the work put before them.  Four years to prepare for the journey.  It took him, and those who rode with him 16 days to make this holy, healing journey.  330 miles on horseback.  They did this for their Ancestors.  They did this, despite how long it took, the hard ride, all of it.  They did this ‘to take their spirits back, to the homeland”.   Around Day 5 they ran right into a blizzard.  They kept going when it passed.  Later they were hit with another, and rode through it to shelter.  They did not stop.  They kept going to where their Ancestors were hung.  They came to bring peace to their Ancestors, to their people, and to offer new peace with the town.

Hail to the brave people, to Jim Miller and all who followed his vision from Great Spirit.  Hail to all who helped them on their journey.  Hail to the 38 plus 2.  Their names are here.

How can we do less for our own Gods, Ancestors, and spirits?  This, among a great many reasons, is why I say you can never offer too much to the Gods, Ancestors, or spirits.  You can never give too much for all the blessings They give us.  Should we give up doubt?  No.  We should embrace ourselves, our doubt, and our path with patience, and follow through on our commitments to the Gods, Ancestors, and spirits.  Hail to Them All.

In the spring of 2005, Jim Miller, a Native spiritual leader and Vietnam veteran, found himself in a dream riding on horseback across the great plains of South Dakota. Just before he awoke, he arrived at a riverbank in Minnesota and saw 38 of his Dakota ancestors hanged. At the time, Jim knew nothing of the largest mass execution in United States history, ordered by Abraham Lincoln on December 26, 1862.

“When you have dreams, you know when they come from the creator… As any recovered alcoholic, I made believe that I didn’t get it. I tried to put it out of my mind, yet it’s one of those dreams that bothers you night and day.”

Now, four years later, embracing the message of the dream, Jim and a group of riders retrace the 330-mile route of his dream on horseback from Lower Brule, South Dakota to Mankato, Minnesota to arrive at the hanging site on the anniversary of the execution. “We can’t blame the wasichus anymore. We’re doing it to ourselves. We’re selling drugs. We’re killing our own people. That’s what this ride is about, is healing.” This is the story of their journey- the blizzards they endure, the Native and Non-Native communities that house and feed them along the way, and the dark history they are beginning to wipe away.

This part in particular sticks out to me:

four years later, embracing the message of the dream, Jim and a group of riders retrace the 330-mile route of his dream on horseback from Lower Brule, South Dakota to Mankato, Minnesota to arrive at the hanging site on the anniversary of the execution.

It took Mr. Miller and those who joined him four years to complete the work put before them.  Four years to prepare for the journey.  It took him, and those who rode with him 16 days to make this holy, healing journey.  330 miles on horseback.  They did this for their Ancestors.  They did this, despite how long it took, the hard ride, all of it.  They did this ‘to take their spirits back, to the homeland”.   Around Day 5 they ran right into a blizzard.  They kept going when it passed.  Later they were hit with another, and rode through it to shelter.  They did not stop.  They kept going to where their Ancestors were hung.  They came to bring peace to their Ancestors, to their people, and to offer new peace with the town.

Hail to the brave people, to Jim Miller and all who followed his vision from Great Spirit.  Hail to all who helped them on their journey.  Hail to the 38 plus 2.  Their names are here.

How can we do less for our own Gods, Ancestors, and spirits?  This, among a great many reasons, is why I say you can never offer too much to the Gods, Ancestors, or spirits.  You can never give too much for all the blessings They give us.  Should we give up doubt?  No.  We should embrace ourselves, our doubt, and our path with patience, and follow through on our commitments to the Gods, Ancestors, and spirits.  Hail to Them All.

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Loki Project Day 11

July 11, 2012 1 comment

Weariness has settled in my bones

Death rattles on my tongue

You stay beneath Yggdrasil’s leaves

Looking hale and young

 

My heart beats heavy in my chest

My blood has run its course

You stand there solemn, waiting

The mother of my horse

 

My eyes close in Death’s embrace

I hear you softly cry

And in the dreams of Life I find

The reason why I die

 

You wait beside the hanging Tree

The vigil long, it lasts

Into Gap and darkened reach

The Runes I find at last

 

My ever-sweet companion

My brother in the blood

My lover who waits beneath my feet

Within the puddling mud

 

I lose you for a moment

Forever and an age

My soul crying out across the Worlds

I cannot see your face

 

Then as sudden as I left

My eyes open wide

Yet only one sees your face

The one that’s left behind

 

Life comes to me in sudden haste

You help me off the Yew

You bind my wounds and tend my ills

Beloved and renewed

 

Sacrifice to he

Who held his vigil long

Who loves in spit of all I’ve said

In spite of all I’ve done

In Praise of the Slain God

April 21, 2012 Leave a comment

A windy tree

Had snapped your neck

The flesh was pierced

With spear run red

Your sullen eyes

Were closed to me

My own open’d

In clawing grief

In roads of Death

You sought the Runes

You took them up

A shatt’ring boon

The Worlds shivered

At your scream

From deepest dark

From sight unseen

You came back then

Your form unbound

Wisdom shared

From then till now

You taught to give

You taught to make

You taught to gift

You taught to take

You taught to see

You taught to know

You taught to speak

Our paths You’ve shown

Hail Yggr!

Hail Hangaguð!

Hail Valtamr!

Hail Runatyr!

Hail, Hail, Hail!

Categories: Poetry Tags: , , , , , , ,
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